Could Chancellor Bouchard Have, Indirectly Through His Rulings, Helped Skadden Arp’s Law Firm Pay its $4.6 Million Fine for Wrongful Activities and Irregularities?

As I’m seeing fines and other crazy headlines roll in against law firm Skadden Arps, I can’t help but reflect on some of the injustices that happened in the TransPerfect Global case. The injustice jumps right out at me when I think about it in light of these new Skadden Arps developments. Let me tell you the latest and let’s see if it jumps out at you too!

Delaware Chancery Court Chancellor Andre Bouchard, a former lawyer from Skadden Arps, an international law firm accused of criminal activity, AND recently fined $4.6 million, ruled subjectively and totally against TransPerfect CEO Philip Shawe in favor of his buddy Kevin Shannon, who represented the plaintiff, Elizabeth Elting, Shawe’s former partner. During the trial, and without evidence, Bouchard wrongly fined Shawe $7.1 million and awarded $1.4 million in legal fees, which were un-substantiated, to his good friend Kevin Shannon who I believe he potentially colluded with during the decision making period of the trial while in a forum together in New Orleans.

Bouchard also appointed his former partner Robert Pincus (another Skadden Arps attorney) as the Custodian of TransPerfect, who then, in my view, ripped off the company to the tune of over $25 million — an unprecedented amount of money, again without substantiation or itemized consideration — all approved by Chancellor Bouchard.

Then of course we have the appeal upheld by Delaware Chief Supreme Court Justice, Leo Strine, despite the fact the whole deal was an illegal “TAKING” under the 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution! Guess what? Leo Strine is another former Skadden Arps attorney! Chancellor Bouchard refuses to release the billings to the Public because, in my opinion, he is afraid of what might be established and perceived.

As another aside, Paul Manafort, former Trump campaign manager, could probably get 19 years in prison for unrelated, process crimes created by the fact that a false document was filed, yet Skadden Arps only receives a $4.6 million dollar fine and a slap on the wrist to boot, for what I consider an outrageous illegal activity! There’s a HUGE INEQUITY here, folks!

Skadden Arps could be corrupt in my opinion, and as I see it, possibly all of these Delaware attorneys (former Skadden Arps guys) could be corrupt as well. Could there be huge kickbacks to all concerned here?? It is all far too cute and convenient, and yes incestuous, for my comfort.

Folks if there was ever the appearance of an impropriety, this is definitely one! And it needs to be investigated!

I call for the FBI and the Department of Justice to start an immediate investigation, as federal crimes could have been purloined here? It looks to me as if the State of Delaware is protecting its own, so the feds need to get involved! How is it that Manafort goes to jail, while Skadden Arps escapes with a fine that is a drop in the bucket of their billions in revenue?!

All while Bouchard, Pincus, and Strine — along with Kevin Shannon — could possibly be laughing all the way to an offshore-island bank ? WHERE IS JUSTICE, WHERE IS EQUITY? In my view there is no justice anymore in the State of Delaware! Shame! TIME FOR THE FEDS TO GET INVOLVED?!

Please look over excerpts from the articles below to glean this nefarious information and background.

 


 

 

New York Times — January 17, 2019

“WASHINGTON — A global New York-based law firm has agreed to pay $4.6 million to settle a Justice Department investigation into whether its work for a Russia-aligned Ukrainian government violated lobbying laws.

The investigation stems from work that the firm, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, did with Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman. The case overlaps with the investigation of the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

As part of the settlement, the law firm agreed to register retroactively as a foreign agent for Ukraine in addition to paying the government $4.6 million, representing the money it earned from its work in Ukraine.

The settlement between the firm and the Justice Department, which was made public on Thursday, is the latest indication that Mr. Mueller’s inquiry and related investigations are fundamentally challenging the lucrative but shadowy foreign-lobbying industry that has thrived in Washington.

 


 

AXIOS — February 15,2019

 

Prosecutors for special counsel Robert Mueller said in a new court filing that President Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort should serve between 19.5 and 24.5 years in prison for the financial crimes for which he was convicted in a Virginia court last August.

“In the end, Manafort acted for more than a decade as if he were above the law, and deprived the federal government and various financial institutions of millions of dollars. The sentence here should reflect the seriousness of these crimes, and serve to both deter Manafort and others from engaging in such conduct.”

Why it matters: This would essentially be a life sentence for the 69-year-old Manafort. He is also facing a separate case in D.C., where a judge recently ruled that he had violated his plea agreement with Mueller and could therefore lose out on any potential leniency he might be offered.

 


 

NEW YORK TIMES — February 2, 2018

“Mr. Mueller’s inquiry threatens the delicate balance that Skadden has struck between lucrative sources of revenue. The firm has made huge profits from corporate work for image-conscious United States companies, while also representing riskier international clients, such as Russian oligarchs and companies with close ties to President Vladimir V. Putin and former Soviet states.

Skadden’s work advising controversial foreign clients was probably prompted by the same aggressive risk-taking that fueled the firm’s rise from scrappy upstart to top-grossing legal giant with a range of practice areas, said Lincoln Caplan, a research scholar at Yale Law School and the author of “Skadden: Power, Money, and the Rise of a Legal Empire.”

“The mentality is that Skadden wouldn’t be afraid of doing something like this, if there was a chance to utilize their skills and status to take advantage of what sounds like a very lucrative business, and they saw no legal or ethical proscription against their taking on the matter,” he said.

Skadden’s work is part of a trend in recent years of lobbyists and lawyers earning increasingly larger paydays by marketing their connections in Washington to foreign politicians, countries and companies willing to pay hefty fees to burnish their reputations in the United States and on the international stage